Sharpeye (PU)

Storms - 5’10 1/2 x 18 3/4 x 2 3/8 - 26.8 Litres Ridden by Liam O’Brien

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Ride this board if...

you’re looking to push your performance on an everyday basis.

Under the hood...

The ‘Storms’ is Kanoa Igarashi’s new signature model for small to medium waves. Based on the original Disco Inferno squash, we added more area to the nose and created a bump squash on the outline for easier tight turning. We increased the nose thickness by pushing the volume forward and kept the same rocker and similar single to double concave as the original Disco Inferno. This board glides through flat sections and it can easily turn in the tighter sections of the wave, making it a new go to board for all QS warriors and local shredders. An overall great performance board for everyday conditions.

5’4 - 6’6 Available Sizes
1-5 ft Wave Size
5/5 Paddle Power
5/5 Drive / speed
5/5 Manoeuvrability
Thruster Fin Setup
PU Construction
“If you’re looking for a quality all-round surfboard that is also capable in the small stuff, I would strongly recommend the ‘Storms.’”

Liam's Conclusion

The ‘Storms’ was a slightly higher volume, slightly shorter all-round shortboard that could adeptly handle small surf. This model was one I thoroughly enjoyed throughout the test. Being slightly larger in volume as well as having more area in the nose than my typical shortboard, I immediately noticed how well the board paddled. These attributes also translated into a sense of glide both off the take-off and down the line. The board traversed dead sections without trouble and gracefully sped through transitions. More impressively, in spite of being geared up to maximise speed, the board surfed incredibly well on rail. I was able to push my turns hard without it skipping out as well as surf tight in the pocket. It released on cue and overall provided a stable feeling underfoot that served whatever intentions I had on the wave. It was this deference the board had for my surfing that charmed me most. Personally, I could see myself riding this type of board on the QS. If you’re looking for a quality all-round surfboard that is also capable in the small stuff, I would strongly recommend the ‘Storms.’

Sharpeye (EPS)

subMOONfish - 5’10 1/2 x 18 3/4 x 2 3/8 - 26.8 Litres Ridden by Liam O’Brien

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  • Shaper: Brendan Leckie

Liam's Conclusion

The EPS version of the ‘Storms’ was at first glance a dream groveller. The models shorter, wider profile combined with epoxy technology endowed the board all the assets necessary to perform in small waves. Thus, when I took the board out in some punchy beach breaks, I had low expectations. But much to my surprise the board held in just as well as its PU twin. The anticipated jitteriness was nowhere to be seen. It cut through wind chops and held its line as if it were a waterlogged old beater. The only difference being that it was also as light and zippy as any epoxy I’ve ridden. This impressive performance is likely linked to the ‘Aero Blank’ (a high-density EPS blank designed to combine the best features of both PU and EPS) from which the board was cut. Sharp Eye’s EPS E2 tech also made the board feel fast and spring-loaded. The amalgam of the two being the lively yet stable feeling I detected in the board. As an epoxy, this board is a great option. It can grovel extremely well but can also perform in quality waves. I would ride it in anything from barely ridable ripples to high-performance conditions.

5’4 - 6’6 Available Sizes
1-4 ft Wave Size
5/5 Paddle Power
5/5 Drive / speed
5/5 Manoeuvrability
Thruster Fin Setup
EPS Construction

PU VS EPS

I rode both the EPS and PU versions of the ‘Storms’ model in similar, punchy beach break conditions. Both boards performed exceptionally well, allowing me to surf how I wanted to surf and giving me a little bit of extra speed to negotiate the dead sections. Whilst the PU was remarkably solid in all aspects, I would have to choose the EPS as my preferred board. The one exception being if the waves got above three or four foot but even then, it would be a tough decision. My rationale for preferring the EPS over the PU was pretty simple: it was just quicker. The board did everything the PU did but with more pace. It responded quicker, rode through transitions quicker, had more off the mark speed and had a general liveliness about it that elevated my surfing. That’s not to say the PU was a bad board because it wasn’t. But for me personally, the epoxy was the pick.